Dehumanization, then criminalization, then incarceration, brutality or death.

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js
//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

#BlackLivesMatter Wants to Bail Out Memphis Moms for #MothersDay

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Criminal records are keeping millions of men out of the workforce — and it’s hurting the economy

Criminal records are keeping millions of men out of the workforce — and it’s hurting the economy

Keeping people in jail before trial increases the rate of guilty pleas, and decreases job prospects

Keeping people in jail before trial increases the rate of guilty pleas, and decreases job prospects

Transgender woman found dead in prison during legal battle with corrections officials https://t.co/KXRdwaCKSa pic.twitter.com/pzPhxlTFqy

— ThinkProgress(@thinkprogress) August 23, 2016

U.S. To Stop Federal Prison Privatization After Investigation Shows
Contractor Run Facilities Are More Dangeroushttps://t.co/O4w5Om0GKu

— CorpWatch(@CorpWatch) August 20, 2016

Wrongly Jailed over a Dream, Newly Free Clarence Moses-EL on Ending His 28-Year Nightmare

Clarence Moses-EL has walked free after 28 years behind bars for a crime he says he didn’t commit. In 1989, Moses-EL, who is African-American, was sentenced to 48 years in prison after a woman said she dreamed he was the man who raped and beat her in the dark. Moses-EL has always maintained his innocence. The police threw out a rape kit and any possible evidence, like bed sheets and her clothes. Then in 2012, another man confessed to the attack. But Moses-EL remained behind bars until this week, after his conviction was overturned. In a Democracy Now! exclusive, Clarence Moses-EL joins us to discuss his newfound freedom and how another person’s dream became his nearly three-decade nightmare.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.democracynow.org

Sandra Bland update

 

On December 21th 2015, the grand jury said it will bring no charges in the death of Sandra Bland. She died in jail last July, three days after a traffic stop in Waller County, Texas. Two videos of the stop went viral. The medical examiner said she had hanged herself using a trash bag.

Her family seriously doubts it was suicide. Jail officials did not think she was depressed either, even after she told them that she had tried to take her life last year after a miscarriage. They did not put her on suicide watch.

Assata Shakur:

“In prisons, it is not at all uncommon to find a prisoner hanged or burned to death in his cell. No matter how suspicious the circumstances, these deaths are always ruled “suicides.” They are usually Black inmates, considered to be a “threat to the orderly running of the prison.” They are usually among the most politically aware and socially conscious inmates in the prison.”

Continue reading

Sourced through Scoop.it from: abagond.wordpress.com

Criminalizing the Classroom: Inside the School-to-Prison Pipeline

New York City has more than 5,000 police officers patrolling the city’s schools—that’s more than the combined number of school guidance counselors and social…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

What you see in the screen grab of the video is a special needs Latino child who has been handcuffed on the biceps because the handcuffs were too loose for his wrists. A Black special needs student was also handcuffed.

 

American – stop this – seriously – stop.

#PrisonReform Tweets 9.5

#PrisonReform Tweets 9.5

Brothers McCollum 51, Brown 47, Finally Compensated after 30 years wrongfully incarcerated

Henry McCollum sits stunned as applause rings out in a Robeson County courtroom in Lumberton, N.C. Tuesday, September 2, 2014, after a judge has declared McCollum and his brother Leon Brown innocent of a brutal rape murder for which they have spent 30 years in prison. Behind him is Beverly Lake, Jr., founder of the Innocence Commission, who was vital in the process to free the men. Photo: Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images

Sourced through Scoop.it from: goodblacknews.org

The knife pulled half way out kind of justice.

The knife pulled half way out kind of good news.

 

#AbolishPrisons