The United States has the highest child poverty rates in the developed world

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Flint Water Crisis

Flint Water Crisis

What Is Privilege? [VIDEO]

Questions:
If your parents worked nights and weekends to support your family, take one step back.
If you are able to move through the world without fear of sexual assault, take one step forward.
If you can show affection for your romantic partner in public without fear of ridicule or violence, take one step forward.
If you have ever been diagnosed as having a physical or mental illness/disability, take one step back.
If the primary language spoken in your household growing up was not english, take one step back.
If you came from a supportive family environment take one step forward.
If you have ever tried to change your speech or mannerisms to gain credibility, take one step back.
If you can go anywhere in the country, and easily find the kinds of hair products you need and/or cosmetics that match your skin color, take one step forward.
If you were embarrassed about your clothes or house while growing up, take one step back.
If you can make mistakes and not have people attribute your behavior to flaws in your racial/gender group, take one step forward.
If you can legally marry the person you love, regardless of where you live, take one step forward.
If you were born in the United States, take one step forward.
If you or your parents have ever gone through a divorce, take one step back.
If you felt like you had adequate access to healthy food growing up, take one step forward
If you are reasonably sure you would be hired for a job based on your ability and qualifications, take one step forward.
If you would never think twice about calling the police when trouble occurs, take one step forward.
If you can see a doctor whenever you feel the need, take one step forward.
If you feel comfortable being emotionally expressive/open, take one step forward.
If you have ever been the only person of your race/gender/socio-economic status/ sexual orientation in a classroom or workplace setting, please take one step back.
If you took out loans for your education take one step backward.
If you get time off for your religious holidays, take one step forward.
If you had a job during your high school and college years, take one step back.
If you feel comfortable walking home alone at night, take one step forward.
If you have ever traveled outside the United States, take one step forward.
If you have ever felt like there was NOT adequate or accurate representation of your racial group, sexual orientation group, gender group, and/or disability group in the media, take one step back.
If you feel confident that your parents would be able to financially help/support you if you were going through a financial hardship, take one step forward.
If you have ever been bullied or made fun of based on something that you can’t change, take one step back.
If there were more than 50 books in your house growing up, take one step forward.
If you studied the culture or the history of your ancestors in elementary school take one step forward.
If your parents or guardians attended college, take one step forward.
If you ever went on a family vacation, take one step forward.
If you can buy new clothes or go out to dinner when you want to, take one step forward.
If you were ever offered a job because of your association with a friend or family member, take one step forward.
If one of your parents was ever laid off or unemployed not by choice, take one step back.
If you were ever uncomfortable about a joke or a statement you overheard related to your race, ethnicity, gender, appearance, or sexual orientation but felt unsafe to confront the situation, take one step back.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

My daughter reminded me about this video. It’s a good one.

Public Policy and Blaming Poor Black Communities For Their Own Poverty [VIDEO]

On the 50th anniversary of the Moynihan Report (The Negro Family: The Case For National Action), john a. powell of the Haas Institute discusses the economic and political struggles faced by black communities today

Source: therealnews.com

 

Powell explains:

 

  • Segregation was [and is] about separating access to opportunity.
  • The War on Drugs is really a war on Black people.
  • We may have a plutocracy now. Rule by the rich.
  • White people don’t see Black people as being part of the country, as being legitimate members.
  • We bailed out banks, and GM with billions of dollars, but we did not bail out Detroit to help the African-Americans who live there.

 

 

Cop buys mom car seat instead of ticket – CNN Video

 

A Michigan police officer buys a needy mom a booster seat instead of issuing her a ticket. WXMI has more.

Source: www.cnn.com

 

Interesting.

 

This is not how people in the community of Ferguson are treated.

 

I’m calling out White privilege.

 

If this mom was not white is would go like this:

 

  1. Child Protective Services would take her child away.
  2. Mom would be ticketed for the infraction.
  3. Mom would not have money to pay ticket.
  4. Warrant for arrest of mom is issued.
  5. Mom is stopped for looking suspicious.
  6. Cop runs mom’s id and finds there is a warrant out for her un-paid fines.
  7. Mom is incarcerated until she can be bailed out.
  8. If she is ever released from jail she is billed for her food, housing and administrative costs.
Did you hear the words ‘tough on crime’ in this story? No.
Did you hear the words child endangerment? No.
I’m calling out double standards, hypocrisy and racism in the U.S. police force.

Don’t Forget About The Hood – Jasiri X

 

Directed by Emmai Alaquiva, “Don’t Forget About The Hood” illustrates how the issues of the poor and urban communities have been all but forgotten in this current election season, and wonders what happened to all of the energy and organizing that took place in the wake of the tragic murder of Trayvon Martin.

“Don’t Forget About the Hood” was produced in collaboration withhttp://hoodievote.org with Da Ricanstrukta providing the powerful soundtrack

LYRICS
See cause we broke they forget about the hood
So when you vote don’t forget about the hood
I ain’t telling folks don’t get up out the hood
just when you living good don’t forget about the hood

Let’s say we did it for the hood
Put on your fitted and you hood

I’m talking to the those you know that’s living in the hood
that ain’t getting what they should
we won’t forget the hood

We the lost and forgotten called rotten so we tossed to the bottom
Let em tell it we the source of the problem
They call us gangbangers and illegals
Cane slangers of da evil
Like we the main danger to the people
So our issues don’t get the same anger or treated equal
if you not one of them change raisers they don’t see you
So the hood every week is ignored
Before these politicians speak to the poor they reach for the door
now voter ID is the norm
Police brutality’s not reformed poverty’s even more
Tens of thousands of human beings they still deport
And they made it a felony if you come back and get caught
We need to stop cheering for sides like its a sport
Vote for your self and your own hood time is short
Cause doing nothing ain’t a option
Do something get it poppin
Real action over talking
The whole world is watching

So when you vote don’t forget about the hood
Get out and vote but don’t forget about the hood
I ain’t telling folks don’t get up out the hood
just when you living good don’t forget about the hood

Let’s say we did it for the hood
Put on your fitted and you hood

I’m talking to the those you know that’s living in the hood
that ain’t getting what they should
we won’t forget the hood

Do we remember Trayvon or is the pain gone
Do we remain strong or did we move way on
Remember when we all had pictures in our hoods
Did we forget about the hood
Zimmerman’s still free I don’t know about you but it kills me
This murderer could be found not guilty
Remember how we organized fortified for the ride
Polarized but mobilized I thought it was so divine
What happened to that energy we need it now more than ever
Many people kept working I will not ignore their effort
Give voice to the voiceless that’s why I record this message If you really for the hood for who or for what you reppin
That the million dollar question
Millionaires is who we follow but they hollow in they lessons
What’s the point of a weapon pointed in the wrong the direction
If your hood is what you reppin how strong is your connection
credits

 

Source: www.youtube.com

This Law Was Based on a Racist Stereotype. Now It Punishes Thousands of Families for Being Poor. 

Last April, Melissa Ortiz, a low-income mother of four, gave testimony to a committee of the California Assembly detailing her life on the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids program, or CalWORKs, the state’s welfare program. “When we first had the twins, the only person in my family getting…

Source: www.slate.com

The Locust Effect: Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence

 

“While the world has made encouraging strides in the fight against global poverty, there is a hidden crisis silently undermining our best efforts to help the poor. It is a plague of everyday violence.”

 

 

Community Village‘s insight:

 

This book is highly recommended by a bunch of people on Good Reads.

 

HT @TheCharlesiWas

See on www.barnesandnoble.com