President Trump’s actions yesterday make life-saving #healthcare even less accessible for millions of Americans.

President Trump’s actions yesterday make life-saving #healthcare even less accessible for millions of Americans.

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Justice For Flint

Justice For Flint

Video Shows How Dancing in Public in the Police State is Hazardous to Your Health

Rochester, NY — Brendan Carter was on his way to see his sick uncle last week when he was detained by multiple security officers in the public RTS bus station in Rochester, subsequently assaulted by police and arrested — all over his dancing.

 

Read more at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/video-shows-dancing-public-police-state-hazardous-health/#J3oiQl4RY0It3LQA.99

Sourced through Scoop.it from: thefreethoughtproject.com

#JoyceCurnell dies after being “deprived of water” in Charleston County jail

A 50-year-old woman arrested for failure to pay court fines died in police custody after Charleston, South Carolina, officials failed to provide “reasonable medical care,” lawyers representing her family said this week.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: nytlive.nytimes.com

#JoyceCurnell #SayHerName

Exclusive Dispatch: Private Water Industry Says Water Bills “Have to Go Up” | Aaron Miguel Cantu | Truth-Out.org

Morning sunlight spilled through long, narrow windowpanes inside the ballroom of the Francis Marion hotel, located in the heart of downtown Charleston, South Carolina, where dozens of public officials, company executives, attorneys and consultants had gathered to portend the future of the water industry in the Southeast United States. Beyond the region, their discussion was aimed at reimagining the future of the entire country’s water infrastructure needs – including their hopes to move it into private hands.

I was the only member of the press present at the Southeast Water Infrastructure Summit, a gathering hosted by the National Association of Water Companies (NAWC), “the voice of the private water industry.” Among its top sponsors were American Water, the nation’s largest publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The NAWC covered the lodging and $200 registration fee for all public officials in attendance, including state legislators and utilities regulators from across the United States.

The discussions of the day touched on several private water sector interests, including desalination and how to circumvent eminent domain law. But the topic that received the most attention was the nation’s patchwork of rapidly deteriorating municipal water systems, which are estimated to need more than $1 trillion worth of upgrades. This, water executives said, not only represented a historic opportunity for their businesses, but could also be used as leverage to finally convince Americans to cough up more money for their tap water. It is the classic Shock Doctrine approach – turning a social crisis into a financial shakedown.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.truth-out.org

Private water? Are we going to pay for air next?

Water War Against the Poor: Flint and the Crimes of Capital

by MUMIA ABU-JAMAL

 

In April, 2014, the state-appointed emergency manager, in order to save money, ordered that the city’s water source be changed from Lake Huron to the notoriously polluted Flint River.

 

The switch unleashed a citywide disaster of disease, destruction, and death. Flint was a toxic river, rich in lead, a major pollutant that has devastating effects on brain development, speech and I.Q. levels in children. As soon as it was pumped into municipal water systems, the corrosive waters leached lead from the old pipes, and sped it to some 90,000 homes into the city.

Flint is now a poisoned city, because of its toxic water.

 

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.counterpunch.org

The American town with water too poisonous to drink

Water towers in America usually boast the names of the communities they serve, often with a mascot or slogan; totems of civic pride. Not here. Smudged by driving snow on a recent morning, this one merely proclaims: FLINT WATER PLANT. And this one stands for betrayal, hardship and scandal. Cast your eyes down to the neighbourhoods beyond; homes with sagging roofs and dilapidated porches, and you will see them, bundled-up figures shuffling down the streets. Some carry their loads in their arms, others push trollies through the drifts.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.independent.co.uk

#BlackLivesMatter Tweets 8.26

#BlackLivesMatter Tweets 8.26